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GT talks impact of “Stampede” single

By The Hip Hop Writer
Hip Hop Vibe Staff Writer

The name, GT, may not ring bells just yet, but this relative newcomer has a fusion of old school, which could very well make him hip hop’s next superstar. GT has been making music for some time now and is much-needed breath of fresh air to those who know his work. Recently, GT released his single, “Stampede,” which has been met with a strong critical reaction.

“Stampede” is a return to real lyricism in hip hop, at a time when many popular rappers have stated “lyrics do not matter.” GT is not among the most-popular independent artists out there, but it does not take away from his mission. More than the fortune and the fame, GT just wants to represent his people. This is reflected on his new single.

Hip Hop Vibe was recently afforded the opportunity to speak with the wise GT about his new single, “Stampede.” Engaging Hip Hop Vibe in a full discussion, GT spoke on the impact of his single and the mark he intends to leave on the rap game.

Read the entire interview below:

Why do you feel more people need to hear “Stampede”? I feel that song represents a side of hip hop that isn’t often promoted. Hip hop has many different types of sounds, but the sound of my song has old school elements with new school techniques. So, I feel something creative like that should be given more light and could possibly inspire more creativity in our culture.

Obviously, you are influenced by the old school, who are some of your favorite old school artists? Rakim, KRS-One, LL Cool J, Kool G Rap, Ice Cube, Common, Nas, Jay-Z, B.I.G., 2Pac, Queen Latifah, Guru, CL Smooth. The list goes on.

What was the overall inspiration behind “Stampede?” To show that a raw hip hop song could still be catchy and infectious.

Who produced the beat? My brother Nydy NewSense.

In a rap game where lyrics continue to mean less, how do you feel you will gain stardom? By gaining an emotional connection with the audience. Once that is established people will follow. That is why I always come from the heart with anything I write so the people can feel my songs are genuine.

Do you feel as if there is still an audience for rap music which actually talks about something? Yeah, there definitely is. Look at J. Cole for instance, his album The Sideline Story went number 1 and he talks about a lot of different things on his project. Kendrick Lamar is also getting more and more popular by the minute and his subject matter is ridiculous.

Out of all the independent singles of 2012, where would you, personally, rank “Stampede?” Number 1 all day!!! (laughs). But I feel so strong about my song I would definitely say top 10.

What positives do you feel current hip hop has? Hip hop still has lots of diversity, but the majority of the diversity is in the underground. I always find something fresh and dope to listen to. Now the mainstream is what needs work. More artist and labels need to find better ways to be creative and stop following the same formats over and over again for albums.

What are your overall goals once you gain a true position in hip hop? Well, I’m the type of guy that chases history, so I would go hard to create five classics then bow out. If I made a ton of money, then I would travel the world and help people. Cause when I die I don’t get to tell my story, the people that knew me will. So while I’m here I have to leave the greatest impression I can by just being the best man, husband, father, and friend I can be.

Can you speak about the overall message you are relaying through “Stampede”. The song is about stampeding a movement into the people where their desire for hip hop is a combination of great lyrics and a great beat. Instead of just loving the beat and not caring about the subject matter. I’m basically saying whats wrong with having a beat that knocks while also getting something great from the lyrics. It seems like a win/win situation to me.

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